Assignment what is your angle?

Join the fun at Michelle W. 11:10 am on July 8, 2014 Welcome to The Commons! Tips and Tools Use the field above to start a new conversation. Scroll down to see conversations in progress. Click the arrow icon under any post or comment to reply. Click the envelope icon to receive notifications about that specific conversation. To create a hyperlink, paste a complete URL directly into your post. It will automatically become a link when published. If you’d like to tag another participant, use @ and their username, like this: @michelleweber. Add your blog’s address to your Gravatar profile to make it easy for others to find your site. Commenting Guidelines Please do not post entire original pieces of writing here. You can share an excerpt of a piece-in-progress, or a link to a piece published on your own blog. If you’d like specific feedback on your work, copy and paste this template into a post, adding your details (see below). This makes it easier for everyone to respond to your request. Excerpt: Goal: My Questions: Link (Optional): Please don’t share unrelated or promotional content — it will be removed. And of course, please keep all your comments respectful and supportive. For more, check out the full commenting guidelines. Daily Post editors @benhuberman, @kristastevens, and and I are all here, and Writing 201 is spearheaded by @cherilucas. Happiness Engineers @rootjosh and @jeremeylduvall are also on hand to support you. Feel free to ask us anything!

Join the fun at Michelle W. 11:10 am on July 8, 2014
Welcome to The Commons!
Tips and Tools
Use the field above to start a new conversation. Scroll down to see conversations in progress.
Click the arrow icon under any post or comment to reply. Click the envelope icon to receive notifications about that specific conversation.
To create a hyperlink, paste a complete URL directly into your post. It will automatically become a link when published.
If you’d like to tag another participant, use @ and their username, like this: @michelleweber.
Add your blog’s address to your Gravatar profile to make it easy for others to find your site.
Commenting Guidelines
Please do not post entire original pieces of writing here. You can share an excerpt of a piece-in-progress, or a link to a piece published on your own blog.
If you’d like specific feedback on your work, copy and paste this template into a post, adding your details (see below). This makes it easier for everyone to respond to your request.
Excerpt:
Goal:
My Questions:
Link (Optional):
Please don’t share unrelated or promotional content — it will be removed. And of course, please keep all your comments respectful and supportive. For more, check out the full commenting guidelines.
Daily Post editors @benhuberman, @kristastevens, and and I are all here, and Writing 201 is spearheaded by @cherilucas. Happiness Engineers @rootjosh and @jeremeylduvall are also on hand to support you. Feel free to ask us anything!

Finding your angle can be the most challenging and rewarding aspect of the writing and editing process. Here are some ideas to help you find your angle in a piece of writing.
1) What makes you you?
Which elements of your experience and unique perspective couldn’t possibly be present in someone else’s story?

2) What original details do you see in your story?
Collecting original details: “If you ask a group of people to write about the contents of their closet, each person would likely approach the same subject from a different angle.” Adair Lara offers more tips to help you find your specific angle and gather the details you need for your story.

3) How can you mine your personal history for just the right angle?

Finding fodder in your own life:
Dig into memories of “magical” childhood adventures.
Tap into your inner world of dreams.
Think about the experiences that have moved, affected, or changed you.
Recall fleeting, unexpected encounters.
Consider your peculiar passions, esoteric interests, and pet peeves.

4) Once you’ve got detail, look even closer — a new angle may be waiting to surprise you.
Take a page out of Amy Tan’s book. She finds new details by looking closely at familiar items.
Identifying new angles in the familiar:
Revisit old diary pages or letters and compare past you and present you.
Research an event you once attended to gather big picture details and to place yourself within it.
Compare notes with others who were also there.
“Build up” a memory with outside sources — then see where and how your perspective fits.

5) Consider using an object as a way “in” to the story.

 

About Jackie Paulson

I help authors by doing book reviews, I am an Intuitive Guidance Counselor Experienced Security Officer, Paralegal, Bachelor Degree Tech Mgmt, Master in HR Generalist, Barber/Hair Stylist 20+ years, Internet guru, Research, Blogger, Mom, Great Clips Hair Expert. Jackie Paulson © 2014-2016
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1 Response to Assignment what is your angle?

  1. MythRider says:

    YOu might not have time for 100 word stories, but this is great.

    Liked by 2 people

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